Robin Wright Penn, James McAvoy conspire to join Robert Redford for period drama

Wright Penn_McAvoyRobert Redford is throwing his hat back into the directorial ring with a period drama called The Conspirator, and he’s bringing two fine actors along with him.

Based on the real life events surrounding the investigation of former President Abraham Lincoln’s assassination, according to the Variety article, Robin Wright Penn (the upcoming The Private Lives of Pippa Lee) will play Mary Surratt, the only woman who was charged in the conspiracy and James McAvoy (Wanted) will play Frederick Aiken, the man who is charged with defending her and who eventually comes to believe in her innocence.

James Solomon wrote the script, and the film is being produced through the American Film Co., a new production company headed by an online broker named Joe Ricketts whose aim is to tell historically accurate American stories.

Though most of the time period dramas tend to leave me going, “Meh” I like the idea of a production company that’s interested in telling American stories because as Neil Gaiman pointed out in his first novel American Gods, the United States both does and doesn’t have a rich history of lore and legend from which great stories can be told.

I mean, honestly? If more young women heard about the story of Hannah Duston when they were growing up? Think of what kind of societal shifts could take place if women knew that they could be the equal of men when it comes to fighting for freedom.

As un-P.C. as it would be, wouldn’t that be an awesome movie?

Posted on September 14, 2009 at 06:33 by Trisha Lynn · Permalink
In: News

2 Responses

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  1. Written by Andrew Hankins
    on 2009-09-14 at 16:11
    Permalink

    Looking forward to it.

    And I'm so glad I learned about Hannah Duston today. Hells yes.

  2. Written by Andrew Hankins
    on 2009-09-14 at 20:11
    Permalink

    Looking forward to it.

    And I'm so glad I learned about Hannah Duston today. Hells yes.

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