EXCLUSIVE (maybe): Is Justin Lin directing the Highlander remake?

high_lin_derAn “inside source” (yep, that’s right) dropped me a line to say that Fast & Furious and Finishing the Game director Justin Lin has recently signed with Summit Entertainment to direct the long-gestating Highlander remake, and is in final negotiations with another producer (alongside longtime Highlander producer Peter S. Davis), whom my source would not name.

Reluctant, as all bloggers should be, to post “news” from a single unnamed source, I contacted Summit for confirmation, to which they replied, “We haven’t confirmed a director at this time.” So, take this rumor with a grain of salt, but me, I think we’ll be hearing some official news on this soon.

If a remake must be made, hopefully they can do the original justice, and considering I enjoyed Fast & Furious well enough, Lin could be the right man to do it — with the right script.

The script associated with the remake’s announcement last spring was penned by the Iron Man team of Art Marcum and Matt Holloway and planned “to expand on the original pic’s premise of immortals battling each other for a mysterious prize” and that it will “mix contemporary settings, action, mythology and medieval Scotland” — however my source says that script is being “worked over,” so I guess there’s no telling what it’s going to be yet. Once again, we shall see.…

After the cut (if you’re seeing this at Movie Make-out, at least) is the trailer for Lin’s Finishing the Game, which looks pretty freakin’ funny and perfectly ’70slicious.

Posted on September 1, 2009 at 11:06 by Gordon@MovieMakeout · Permalink
In: News

7 Responses

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  1. Written by trevoramueller
    on 2009-09-01 at 13:48
    Permalink

    What I want to know is if the Queen theme song will still make an appearance in the flick. That song, to me, is synonymous with Highlander and always gets my blood pumping for some awesome sword fights and decapitation sequences!

  2. Written by arkonbey
    on 2009-09-01 at 14:02
    Permalink

    Begin the Standard Rant:

    The first movie was excellent, perhaps even a classic. Why not come up with something original, please? There has yet to be a remake of a decent film that has come close to the original, so please stop doing it and be original.

    End the Standard Rant

  3. Written by Tom
    on 2009-09-04 at 09:33
    Permalink

    The Departed/Infernal Affairs. 'Nuff Said.

  4. Written by gmcalpin
    on 2009-09-04 at 09:38
    Permalink

    That's my go-to example for “look, remakes can be BETTER than the original sometimes,” too.

    Unfortunately, it's also the only example I can think of. :)

  5. Written by Tom
    on 2009-09-04 at 10:09
    Permalink

    This is a personal preference but 'A Fistfull of Dollars' remake of 'Yojimbo' is another. I know, I know blaspheme to say that the Kurosawa original is less than the remake but I grew up with Fistfull and Clint being 'the man with no name'. Throw in The Magnificent Seven as well. It does things differently but I think it is a worthy remake.

    'The Thing' over 'The Thing from another World'

    Scarface (maybe, I haven't seen the original film from 1932)

  6. Written by arkonbey
    on 2009-09-04 at 20:20
    Permalink

    I'm not saying a re-make can never be as good or better (BSG, for another example), but for the higher percentage, the remakes are bad (I'm looking at you Psycho).

    Yojimbo/Seven Samurai and Fistfull/Magnificent Seven can each be appreciated on their own merits as they are really the same story with two totally different genres. But, yes they are the exception to the rule.

    Carpenter's the Thing doesn't count because the original was a pretty terrible film and Carpenter stuck darn close to the source material (“Who Goes There” by John W. Campbell).

    Scarface '83 was almost a different film than Scarface '32. It's also a gray area for me because while I didn't like '83, it wasn't an obviously terrible remake. Besides, a fifty-year gap may be acceptable, but twenty-three years may be a bit close.

  7. Written by arkonbey
    on 2009-09-05 at 00:20
    Permalink

    I'm not saying a re-make can never be as good or better (BSG, for another example), but for the higher percentage, the remakes are bad (I'm looking at you Psycho).

    Yojimbo/Seven Samurai and Fistfull/Magnificent Seven can each be appreciated on their own merits as they are really the same story with two totally different genres. But, yes they are the exception to the rule.

    Carpenter's the Thing doesn't count because the original was a pretty terrible film and Carpenter stuck darn close to the source material (“Who Goes There” by John W. Campbell).

    Scarface '83 was almost a different film than Scarface '32. It's also a gray area for me because while I didn't like '83, it wasn't an obviously terrible remake. Besides, a fifty-year gap may be acceptable, but twenty-three years may be a bit close.

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