Trailer Watch: Valkyrie full trailer

A new, full trailer for Superman Returns and Usual Suspects director Bryan Singer’s Valkyrie starring Tom Cruise is online at Yahoo! Movies, and yeah, I know, everybody hates Tom Cruise except for me, but this look very exciting. Cruise, of course, plays Colonel Claus von Stauffenberg, a German officer involved in an assassination plot against Adolf Hitler.

I suppose it’s really neither here nor there that nobody in this film is even pretending to have a German accent, since they wouldn’t have been speaking English in any case, but… it’s just weird. I think I’ll be able to get over it for two hours, though.

After changing release dates a lot, Valkyrie is set to hit theaters on December 26. It’s odd how this and Revolutionary Road are opening on the Friday, December 26th. Even with Bedtime Stories, The Curious Case of Benjamin Button, Hurricane Season, Marley & Me, and The Spirit all opening on Christmas, you’d think they would want the extra day’s gross, especially considering Christmas is one of the biggest movie-going days of the year.

Posted on September 25, 2008 at 23:32 by Gordon@MovieMakeout · Permalink
In: Trailers

6 Responses

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  1. Written by MO
    on 2008-09-26 at 17:21
    Permalink

    As a german who regularly watches movies in their original language I’m so glad they speak accent-free.
    I mean, it’s a movie about a very serious subject. That shouldn’t be undermined by the actors speaking some pseudo-funny pseudo-german accent.

    But while we’re on the topic, can someone explain to me this strange infatuation with german accents every american seems to have?

  2. Written by BG
    on 2008-09-26 at 21:47
    Permalink

    when they do movies that are based on a european topic… it makes sense when they place british actors in the roles. it worked in Schindlers List with Liam Neeson, Ralph Fiennes and others.

    the british accent lends a credence of believability that even though these people are not speaking german, the british accent lends an ethereal eurpoean quality and tonal consistancy to it and we accept that.

    so… when they come out with a movie about Claus von Stauffenberg’s attempted assassination of Hitler… and you see A list british actors of quality, such as Stephen Fry, Bill Nighy, Terrence Stamp, hell.. even Eddie Izzard, you accept this can most likely be genuinely pleased with the production.

    until they slap Tom Cruise in the lead role as Claus von Stauffenberg. from an overall feel… he just does NOT fit with the way the rest of this film has been cast.

    Just, so very odd, in my opinion.

  3. Written by Trisha Lynn
    on 2008-09-27 at 09:02
    Permalink

    I think Americans are just fascinated with accents in general, not just German. Though, it’s gotta be accents we can also generally understand (British), from countries that have been long-term allies of ours (Australian), and who haven’t pussied out on us (French).

  4. Written by MO
    on 2008-09-27 at 11:44
    Permalink

    Well, maybe I just tend to notice german accents more than others, but to me it seems that -be it movies, comics or the like -, if the author runs out out funny ideas, he or she tends to insert some strange guy with a german accent, preferably looking a little bit nazi-like.

    I always I fail to see the funny in that …

  5. Written by Jeremy
    on 2008-09-30 at 17:54
    Permalink

    Regarding the accents, two pages for you all.
    http://tvtropes.org/pmwiki/pmwiki.php/Main/TranslationConvention

    http://tvtropes.org/pmwiki/pmwiki.php/Main/JustAStupidAccent

    I definitely prefer the first to the second.

    And also… from the trailer, this looks really rather good. Lots of authentic-looking delicious Third Reich hardware, actual swastikas, and of course a particularly dramatic piece of history at the heart of it all. Definitely going to watch that.

  6. Written by Trisha Lynn
    on 2008-10-01 at 06:55
    Permalink

    Ah, TV Tropes. The most fantastic must-read/time waster of a web site since Wikipedia came along.

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